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MOMENTS TO CONTEMPLATE

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Moments to Contemplate (In Bite-Sized Servings) takes a sardonic look at some of life’s absurdities. Each of these short stories allows the reader to take a short journey—in most cases for less than five minutes—away from the routine chores and challenges of the day and give voice to some of the unspoken but glaring contradictions that face us all. From the quest for self-reliance to the drive for self-actualization, Moments to Contemplate (In Bite-Sized Servings) runs the gamut of the human experience.

For instance, one story touches on the need for one to establish one’s own identity, independence, and some degree of self-sufficiency. Another story shines a light at those among us who, whether for lack of self-respect or confidence, always hold back from enjoying the fruits of their own labor. And the book contains a number of examples of the day-to-day oddities that can bring either delight or maddening exasperation. 

 

In other words, these stories are “moments” that occur in each of our lives. We just don’t always take the time to contemplate them.

Amazon Reviewer

This is a lovely collection of short stories that either make you smile, chuckle, or think. Patrick Andersen's take on the world is both humorous and thoughtful, and his writing style breezy. Perfect as a bed-side read, savoring one story at the time. I just wish the book was longer.

Amazon Reviewer

Patrick Andersen is obviously someone who enjoys writing ... and takes any and every opportunity to do so. The time most of us spend (waste) writing emails and posting on social media, Mr. Andersen spends wisely composing short stories and observations. While most of these stories are rather whimsical, some are thoughtful and poignant.

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Did the Christ become a man, or did a man become the Christ? As I understand it (admittedly with scant study compared to the many scholarly theologians in the field), this was one of the primary questions that prompted the First Council of Nicaea in 325. To people on the edges of or outside of Christianity, the question sounds like splitting hairs over minutiae. Truth be told, many of the faithful even today would probably agree, but the issue had major implications for those who wanted to exert control over the lives of millions.

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